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Is Analysis an art or a science?

Question: Is Analysis an Art or a Science?

Answer:
Part - I
Analysis is an art of keeping it strictly scientific,
until it starts defying itself against the known 'rules',
and that's when to push it towards the realms of 'Strategy'.

Part - II
Analysis is essentially an Art
{lavish, spendthrift and something to marvel about}
that needs to be enclosed within certain boundaries
{make it budgeted and time-bound}
that's when it becomes a Science.
{a tool to extract tangibility out of subtlety}

Part - III
Neither and Both.
The problem with this question is that it is holistic, which it should not be.
The answer would largely depends on the field and domain where the 'expertise' is required.
If the field is predominant with numbers, scientific approach should lead artistry;
Otherwise, let science and data support artistry.

What would be your answer?

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