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Blog by A Mechanic

THE WEBSITE IS LOADED with a lot of caveats and disclaimers. That gets me thinking if they mean more fun than business..? After putting this blog through their "Analyzer" the results came back naming me to be a "Mechanic" and showed a brain-map claiming to indicate the areas of my brain that are supposedly activated while blogging these posts.

Interesting it may seem, I suppose I would take this simply on a lighter note (in any case, this blog is deliberately focused in certain areas by specifically shoving certain ideas. So, there it goes!).

On the other hand it was surely fun to put some of my friends' blogs through Typealyzer (without their knowing) and to find funny details about them..! They most likely would be getting some pointy tweets now :-)


The analysis goes on describing the personality traits as follows:
The Mechanics: The independent and problem-solving type. They are especially attuned to the demands of the moment are masters of responding to challenges that arise spontaneously. They generally prefer to think things out for themselves and often avoid inter-personal conflicts.

The Mechanics enjoy working together with other independent and highly skilled people and often like seek fun and action both in their work and personal life. They enjoy adventure and risk such as in driving race cars or working as policemen and fire-fighters.
Relax, this is strictly for fun!
  • See also:
  • Go here to analyse your writing personality by Typealyzer.com
  • Go here for the Google directory on Personality types and theories.

Comments

  1. Interesting... test!
    validity is questionable (they do it so fast, as if just looking at the name of the blog:)
    i got both doer and thinking type when i put different blogs of mine!

    ReplyDelete
  2. HI.. thanks for dropping by..

    Hmm.. Right.. It gives me different types for my different writing as well. I suppose the point here is to "indicate" the area of one's brain that becomes active for that specific writing..

    Cheers!
    M.

    ReplyDelete

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